ANALYSIS NFL

Top Three Moments of Terrell Owens Career

To honor Terrell Owens, here are the top three moments that made him one of the greatest players of all-time.

To honor Terrell Owens, here are the top three moments that made him one of the greatest players of all-time.

This past weekend, the NFL welcomed one of the most star-studded Hall-of-Fame class of all-time. This year’s inductees included some of the greatest players of all-time in Randy Moss, Ray Lewis, and Brian Dawkins.

Of all the players who was enshrined into the hall on Saturday, no one received more criticism than that of Terrell Owens.

After he was snubs over the last two years, Owens made his unhappiness felt after he declined not to attend the event ceremonial in Canton, and held his own at The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga.

Whether you agree or disagree with his decision, no one can take away the greatness Owens’ showcased throughout his 14-year NFL career.

He became a six-time Pro-Bowler (2000–2004, 2007), five-time first-team All-Pro selection (2000–2002, 2004, 2007), and led the league in NFL receiving in touchdowns three-times 2001, 2002, 2006) throughout his career.

To honor Owens and his great Hall-of-Fame career, here are the top three moments that made him one of the greatest players of all-time.

Game winning Touchdown in 1998

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Before he became the second all-time leading receiver in NFL history, Owens was coming off his breakout season heading into the 1998 playoffs. While helping the San Francisco 49ers reach the playoffs with the 12-4 record, Owens recorded the first 1,000-yard season of his career, as he caught 67 ball and 14 touchdowns.

Of all of his great moments throughout the season, his play against the Green Bay Packers helped kicked off his legendary career.

Owens caught the game-winning touchdown with only three seconds left on the clock, the San Francisco 49ers got over the hump and defeated the Packers during the 1998 postseason. The game ended Mike Holmgren‘s career with the Packers and solidified Owens’ status as an elite clutch performer.

The Passing of the Torch

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In the very last home game of Jerry Rice‘s career with the 49ers, it was Owens who stood triumphant as being the best player in the NFL.

In a 17-0 victory over the Chicago Bears, Owens set a record for most catches in signal game recording 20 passes for 283 yards and a touchdown. His historic performance broke Tom Fears record for most catches in a game, that was set in 1950 when he recorded 18 passes in a single game.

Owens’ performance may have been more memorable, but his record would be surpassed by Brandon Marshall, who made 21 receptions in a game in 2009.

Super Bowl XXIX Performance

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After he was traded to the Philadelphia Eagles in 2004,  Owens may have had the greatest one-year wonders in stint in sports history.

While playing alongside Donovan McNabb, Owens helped the Eagles become the best team in the NFC with a 13-3 record and a trip to the 2004 Super Bowl that same season.

Unfortunately for the Eagles, Owens sustained a severely sprained ankle and a fractured fibula when Dallas Cowboys safety Roy Williams took him down with a horse-collar tackle.

Owens refused to quit on the Eagles. He rehabbed at a super-human level, drank noni juice and vowed to play no matter what—signing waivers so that he’d be allowed to compete against the New England Patriots.

Considered by many to be “the most courageous performance in Super Bowl history”, Owens took his game to another level against one of the best pass defenses of all time.

Catching nine passes for 122 yards, the Patriots had no answer for T.O.

Taking into context his health, the weeks he was removed from the action and the quality of competition he faced, Super Bowl XXIX stands tall as the greatest moment of Owens’ career.

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